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The Paris Review No. 4 Winter 1953

The Paris Review No. 4 Winter 1953

$150.00

Irwin Shaw on Dick Tracy, the doom-conscious generation, and the Art of Fiction.

A fable by Eugene Walter. Stories by Alfred Chester, James Leo Herlihy, and Terry Southern. Poems by Geoffrey Hill, Vilma Howard, Howard Moss, and John Simon.

The Paris Review No. 10 Fall 1955

The Paris Review No. 10 Fall 1955

$100.00

A memory like a “whore’s top drawer” and the Art of Fiction: An interview with James Thurber.

“Whenever you looked at it you heard music, divine music, music such as Steppenwolf heard when Herman Hesse gave him an injection”: Henry Miller introduces a Zev portfolio.

A story by Evan S. Connell. Poems by Adrienne Rich and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 15 Winter 1956

The Paris Review No. 15 Winter 1956

$100.00

“My head has always seemed to me like a brightly lit room, full of the most delightful objects,” Thornton Wilder on the Art of Fiction.

Henri Michaux describes (and draws) a bad peyote trip.

Stories by Pati Hill and Terry Southern. Poems by A. Alvarez and Donald Finkel.

The Paris Review No. 17 Autumn-Winter 1957

The Paris Review No. 17 Autumn-Winter 1957

$100.00

“The moment you grab somebody by the lapels and you’ve got something to tell, that’s a real story”: Frank O’Connor on the Art of Fiction.

A pleasure principle and a Calvinist conscience: Angus Wilson defends his characters.

A story by James Blake. Poems by John Hollander and W.S. Merwin.

The Paris Review No. 18 Spring 1958

The Paris Review No. 18 Spring 1958

$100.00

“The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shock-proof shit-detector”: Ernest Hemingway on the myth of his style and pumping the well.

A portfolio of Giacometti sketches. A story by Philip Roth. Poems by Robert Bly, Louis Simpson, and W. D. Snodgrass.

The Paris Review No. 22 Autumn-Winter 1959-1960

The Paris Review No. 22 Autumn-Winter 1959-1960

$100.00

“I think the best regimen is to get up early, insult yourself a bit in the shaving-mirror, and then pretend you’re cutting wood”: An interview with Lawrence Durrell.

Stories by Samuel Blazer, Cecil Dawkins, and William Styron. Poems by James Dickey and David Ferry.

The Paris Review No. 21 Spring-Summer 1959

The Paris Review No. 21 Spring-Summer 1959

$100.00

“Obscurity comes when the poet is still at the stage of learning how to use the language”: T.S. Eliot on the Art of Poetry.

Ignoring the Golfers: a portfolio of the eastern Long Island painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, and Lee Krasner.

Stories by Terry Southern and Alexander Trocchi. Poems by Geoffrey Hill, Daryl Hine, and Ted Hughes.

The Paris Review No. 20 Autumn-Winter 1958-1959

The Paris Review No. 20 Autumn-Winter 1958-1959

$100.00

James Jones on dialogue (“almost too easy”), characterization (“no human being is really a symbol”), and America (“big, awkward, sprawling”).

Moon rider bound to another paradise: A Marc Chagall portfolio with text by James Lord.

Philip Roth’s Good-bye Columbus.

 

Poems by Robert Bly and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 19 Summer 1958

The Paris Review No. 19 Summer 1958

$100.00

“The more you leave out, the more you highlight what you leave in”: Henry Green on revision, changes in style, and the secrets of a writer’s writer’s writer.

“More drinkers should be dragged to the bottle than from it”: An essay by Niccolo Tucci.

Stories by V. S. Naipaul and Philip Roth. Poems by Philip Larkin and James Merrill.

The Paris Review No. 5 Spring 1954

The Paris Review No. 5 Spring 1954

$100.00

“Damn Dixie baby-talk” and Southern peanut farms: William Styron on the Art of Fiction.

Livres d’Or: Drawing from the bars and restaurants of Paris by Picasso, Toulouse Lautrec, Matisse, and Braque.

Molloy by Samuel Beckett.

The Paris Review No. 6 Summer 1954

The Paris Review No. 6 Summer 1954

$100.00

“In fact it was one of the greatest successes in all modern Italian literature. . . There has never been anything like it”: Alberto Moravia, suffering from a horrible headache, explains his work.

A bohemian paradise in 1920s Paris: Nathan Asch recalls the Café du Dome.

Italo Calvino’s “Last Comes the Raven.”

The Paris Review No. 7 Fall-Winter 1954-1955

The Paris Review No. 7 Fall-Winter 1954-1955

$100.00

“God is a character, a real and consistent being, or He is nothing”: An interview with Joyce Cary.

“She kept nodding her head and pursing her mouth as if withholding some vital information like that the walls were wired to explode”: An essay by Pati Hill.

Drawings by Picasso. Stories by Dino Buzzati, Evan S. Connell, and Mary Lee Settle. Poems by A. Alvarez and Adrienne Rich.

The Paris Review No. 9 Summer 1955

The Paris Review No. 9 Summer 1955

$100.00

“Almost languidly, he pushed the sword home in just the right place, up to the pommel. In that instant Islero raised his head, and stabbed the right horn, the bad one, into the upper part of Manolete’s right thigh”: An essay on the death of a Spanish national hero.

The Art of Fiction: Georges Simenon on the eleven-day novel.

Self-portraits by Matisse, Chagall, and Leger.

The Paris Review No. 27 Winter-Spring 1962

The Paris Review No. 27 Winter-Spring 1962

$90.00

“He put me in this little room. He didn’t actually lock the door but he said, ‘Stay in there!’ And I did. I just sat down, and it just came”: Mary McCarthy on the Art of Fiction.

Stories by Harry Mathews and Mauro Senesi. Poems by Denise Levertov, Adrienne Rich, and May Swenson.

The Paris Review No. 25 Winter-Spring 1961

The Paris Review No. 25 Winter-Spring 1961

$80.00

“It’s a terrible struggle, because what you really feel hasn’t got the form, it’s not what you can put down in a poem”: Robert Lowell on the Art of Poetry.

Kafka-inspired engravings by Lars Bo.

Stories by Bowden Broadwater, Hughes Rudd, and Jan Gerhard Toonder. Poems by Donald Davie and Thom Gunn.

The Paris Review No. 24 Summer-Fall 1960

The Paris Review No. 24 Summer-Fall 1960

$80.00

“Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat”: Robert Frost on the Art of Poetry.

Tangerines, blizzards, and Dr. Zhivago: An interview with Boris Pasternak.

Stories by Gina Berriault, Elizabeth Savage, and Thomas Whitbread. Poems by Christopher Middleton and X.J. Kennedy.

The Paris Review No. 23 Spring 1960

The Paris Review No. 23 Spring 1960

$80.00

“I’m all for sticking pins into Episcopal behinds, and that sort of thing”: Aldous Huxley on acid, Freud, and the Art of Fiction.

A fictional journey at sea by Malcolm Lowry.

A story by Max Steele. Poems by Louis Simpson and William Stafford.

The Paris Review No. 39 Fall 1966

The Paris Review No. 39 Fall 1966

$80.00

“One mustn’t be so rigid or egotistical to think that every comma is sacrosanct”: Edward Albee on the Art of Theater.

An Art of Theater interview with Harold Pinter.

e.e. cummings’ letters to Ezra Pound. Stories by Leonard Michaels and Dallas E. Wiebe.

The Paris Review No. 38 Summer 1966

The Paris Review No. 38 Summer 1966

$80.00

Arthur Miller on the Art of Theater.

“Besides being one of the great talents of this century, Malcolm Lowry was also a ferocious drunk, fallen and exiled heir to the back parlor of the Establishment, seastruck fumble-thumbed sailor, composer of hack foxtrots and banger of jazz ukeleles, remittance man, syphilophobe, masturbator, poet, myth-maker and Faust”: Conrad Knickerbocker on Malcolm Lowry.

A story by James Salter. Poems by Leroi Jones and John Montague.

The Paris Review No. 37 Spring 1966

The Paris Review No. 37 Spring 1966

$80.00

Howl, Kerouac and the birth of beat, and Cézanne’s Petites Sensations: Allen Ginsberg on the Art of Poetry.

The poet of the automobile: An interview with Blaise Cendrars, plus a portfolio of poems.

Ned Rorem’s Paris diaries. Stories by Donald Barthelme and Jerome Charyn. Poems by Blaise Cendrars and Gary Snyder.

The Paris Review No. 36 Winter 1966

The Paris Review No. 36 Winter 1966

$80.00

An Art of Fiction interview with Saul Bellow.

An anecdoted topography of chance: Daniel Spoerri maps Room 13 at the Hotel Carcassone.

A story by William Styron. Poems by Barbara Guest, Lorine Niedecker, and Joel Oppenheimer.

The Paris Review No. 35 Fall 1965

The Paris Review No. 35 Fall 1965

$80.00

An Art of Fiction interview with William Burroughs.

“When I first took my own group on 52nd Street, in ‘44, people used to ask us, ‘What is that crap? What is that Chinese music?’” An interview with Dizzy Gillespie.

Stories by Irvin E. Faust, Leonard Gardner, and Clancy Sigal.

The Paris Review No. 34 Spring-Summer 1965

The Paris Review No. 34 Spring-Summer 1965

$80.00

“The need to restore warmth to people’s lives is our most imperative task. This alone can save us, save the whole planet”: Yevgeny Yevtushenko on the Art of Poetry.

Committed writing and humanizing Sartre: an interview with Simone de Beauvoir.

Stories by Stanley Elkin and Harry Mathews. Poems by Basil Bunting, Gary Snyder, and John Wieners.

The Paris Review No. 33 Winter-Spring 1965

The Paris Review No. 33 Winter-Spring 1965

$80.00

“Mr. William Randolph Hearst caused a little excitement by getting up in the middle of the first act and leaving with his party of ten. I vomited in the back aisle”: Lillian Hellman on the Art of Theater.

“Then and Now”: A symposium on the expatriate tradition.

Poems by Denise Levertov, George Oppen, Robert Creeley, and Galway Kinnell.

The Paris Review No. 32 Summer-Fall 1964

The Paris Review No. 32 Summer-Fall 1964

$80.00

“It is not inspiration; it is expiration”: Jean Cocteau on the Art of Fiction.

“Facing the universe of sound”: William Carlos Williams on the Art of Poetry.

William Fifield interviews Pablo Picasso.

A story by Stanley Elkin. Poems by Robert Bly and Charles Olson.

The Paris Review No. 31 Winter-Spring 1964

The Paris Review No. 31 Winter-Spring 1964

$80.00

“Experience is a dim lamp which only lights the one who bears it”: An interview with Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

“Style is character”: Norman Mailer on the Art of Fiction.

Jack Kerouac and Henry Miller on Céline.

Poems by Donald Hall and Geoffrey Hill.

The Paris Review No. 30 Summer-Fall 1963

The Paris Review No. 30 Summer-Fall 1963

$80.00

A cranky S. J. Perelman gets choked up over Joyce and rants against Hollywood jackals.

An Art of Fiction interview with Evelyn Waugh.

Van Go, Van Gock, Van Guff: John Mulligan on the making of the movie Lust for Life.

 

A story by Dante Troisi. Poems by Fred Chapell and Philip Levine.

The Paris Review No. 29 Winter-Spring 1963

The Paris Review No. 29 Winter-Spring 1963

$80.00

Katherine Anne Porter on the “we” of family and dark clouds moving in her head.

“How can you stay in the ant-heap?” Lawrence Durrell and Henry Miller exchange letters.

Stories by Stephen Dixon and Malcolm Lowry. Poems by Edward Field, Jean Garrigue, and Anne Stevenson.

The Paris Review No. 28 Summer-Fall 1962

The Paris Review No. 28 Summer-Fall 1962

$80.00

The Buddhist monk who swallowed a canary: Henry Miller on the Art of Fiction.

Confucianism, fascism, and treason: An interview with Ezra Pound.

An essay by Alfred Chester. Stories by Ingeborg Bachmann, Samuel Beckett, and Jorge Luis Borges. Poems by Patrick Bowles, Donald Finkel, and William Meredith.

The Paris Review No. 26 Summer-Fall 1961

The Paris Review No. 26 Summer-Fall 1961

$80.00

Marianne Moore on exhilarating biology, the Brooklyn Dodgers, the art of quotation, and her “so-called poems.”

Norman Mailer on “The Psychology of the Orgy”.

Anna Akhmatova, Osip Mandelstam, Boris Pasternak, and Marina Tsvetayeva: A portfolio of Russian poetry.

The Paris Review No. 48 Fall 1969

The Paris Review No. 48 Fall 1969

$80.00

“A Rolls-Royce mind bumping and humming”: E. B. White on the Art of the Essay.

“I sit here in a kind of stupor and call it thought”: John Steinbeck weeps over Petrarch’s sonnets and charts signals from a distant star.

Stories by Donald Barthelme, Evan S. Connell, and Joy Williams. Poems by Gerard Malanga.

The Paris Review No. 42 Winter-Spring 1968

The Paris Review No. 42 Winter-Spring 1968

$80.00

Whitmanitus and verse symphonies: Conrad Aiken on the Art of Poetry.

Blaise Cendrars on Gustave Lerouge and Arthur Cravan.

Stories by Leonard Michaels and Mordecai Richler. Poems by Lewis MacAdams and Peter Schjeldahl.

The Paris Review No. 41 Summer-Fall 1967

The Paris Review No. 41 Summer-Fall 1967

$80.00

“I am an obscure, doubly obscure, novelist with an unpronounceable name”: An interview with Vladimir Nabokov.

Stories by Kenward Elmslie, Edward Hoagland, and John Phillips. Poems by John Ashbery, Frank Lima, and James Schuyler.

The Paris Review No. 40 Winter-Spring 1967

The Paris Review No. 40 Winter-Spring 1967

$80.00

Epic literature, false poets, and why cabs are yellow: An interview with Jorge Luis Borges.

“How old should they be before they smoke marijuana?” John Cage on how to improve the world.

Stories by Frank Conroy, Christina Stead, and M. E. White. Poems by Ted Hughes and Aram Saroyan.

The Paris Review No. 74 Fall-Winter 1978

The Paris Review No. 74 Fall-Winter 1978

$75.00

Joan Didion on experience, lies, and the Art of Fiction.

“I managed to do well academically at Syracuse despite the concerted efforts of my sorority to prevent me . . .” Joyce Carol Oates on the Art of Fiction.

Margaret Drabble on Freud, motherhood, and the use of education to a woman.

Stories by Pati Hill and Alexander Theroux. Poems by Thomas Lux, Jay Parini, and Derek Walcott.

The Paris Review No. 73 Spring-Summer 1978

The Paris Review No. 73 Spring-Summer 1978

$75.00

“Suspense comes from making sure your algebra is right. Time is the only critic”: James M. Cain on the Art of Fiction.

Anthony Powell on gloomy Oxford days, Proust’s eroticism, and prosopography.

Stories by Barton Midwood, David Rieff, and Dallas Wiebe. Poems by Don Bogen and Ronald Wallace.

The Paris Review No. 72 Winter 1977

The Paris Review No. 72 Winter 1977

$75.00

“A man like Sartre can get a whole book out of a proposition which is, on the face of it, untrue”: Richard Wilbur on the Art of Poetry.

Stories by Stephen Minot, Carolyn Osborne, and Joy Williams. Poems by Billy Collins, Gene Frumkin, and Penelope Gilliatt.

The Paris Review No. 71 Fall 1977

The Paris Review No. 71 Fall 1977

$75.00

Jessamyn West and Marguerite Young on the Art of Fiction.

Norman Glass on The Decline and Fall of Alfred Chester .

Fiction by Gerald Dorset and Arno Karlen. Poems by David Ignatow, Erica Jong, and David Ray.

The Paris Review No. 70 Summer 1977

The Paris Review No. 70 Summer 1977

$75.00

“Shit, piss, and bellow, kick and wiggle: that’s it!” An interview with William Gass.

Stories by Peter Handke, C. W. Gusewelle, and William S. Wilson. Poems by Brendan Galvin and Galway Kinnell.

The Paris Review No. 66 Summer 1976

The Paris Review No. 66 Summer 1976

$60.00

“The ideal audience is a man like Bill Gass”: Stanley Elkin on the Art of Fiction.

Aphrodite Chuckass, Zoda Viola Klontz Gazola, Fanny Fangboner: John Train on how to name your baby.

Stories by William Reese Hamilton, Lamar Herrin, Barton Midwood, and Richard Stern. Poems by Edward Hirsch and Peter Payack.

The Paris Review No. 64 Winter 1975

The Paris Review No. 64 Winter 1975

$60.00

“Dylan Thomas and Yeats—I’m not saying they’re bad poets, but I do think they’re bad influences, especially on a young writer”: An interview with Kingsley Amis.

P. G. Wodehouse on his ninetieth birthday, the passing of Jack Kerouac, and his fondness for spats.

Stories by Tom Disch and Diane Vreuls. Poems by Kate Braverman and Jane Kenyon.

The Paris Review No. 63 Fall 1975

The Paris Review No. 63 Fall 1975

$60.00

“Once you’ve survived Dublin there’s not much they can do to you anywhere else to cut through your hide”: An interview with J.P. Donleavy.

John Steinbeck on inspiration, hack writing, and writing a good short story.

Stories by Andrei Codrescu and Dallas Wiebe. Poems by Robert Bly and Wililam Matthews.

The Paris Review No. 62 Summer 1975

The Paris Review No. 62 Summer 1975

$60.00

James Wright on Horatian craftsmanship, Judas, the talent for happiness, and the Art of Poetry.

Stories by Joe Brainard and Richard Ford. Poems by Diane Ackerman, Paul Hoover, and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 61 Spring 1975

The Paris Review No. 61 Spring 1975

$60.00

Bernard Malamud on Mailer’s doppelganger, the morality of art, and the prison motif.

George Wickes recalls Natalie Barney.

Stories by M. F. Beal, David Evanier, and Giles Gordon. Poems by Richard Wilbur.

The Paris Review No. 76 Fall 1979

The Paris Review No. 76 Fall 1979

$60.00

“Steer clear of English. Learn foreign, preferably dead languages”: An interview with Peter Levi.

“When I first came here, a neighbor told the whole village that I practiced black magic”: Jean Rhys on The Art of Fiction.

Stories by David Evanier and Norman Lock. Poems by Pier Paolo Pasolini.

The Paris Review No. 75 Spring 1979

The Paris Review No. 75 Spring 1979

$60.00

“In modern Christian symbolism a sweeter image of Jesus with the sheep in his arms has evolved, but I like the old image of Christ as the warring dragon”: An interview with John Gardner.

Peter Handke's Fantasies and Prejudices.

Stories by Andre Dubus and Mary Morris. Poems by Seamus Heaney and Octavio Paz.

The Paris Review No. 69 Spring 1977

The Paris Review No. 69 Spring 1977

$60.00

“There is nothing like death to say what is always such an artificial thing to say: ‘The End’”: Kurt Vonnegut on the Art of Fiction.

Stories by William Burroughs, Ed Sanders, and Alan Ziegler. Poems by Frank O’Hara.

The Paris Review No. 68 Winter 1976

The Paris Review No. 68 Winter 1976

$60.00

The ruby-colored adobe of Taos, writing for the lumberman, and Tennessee’s appendectomy: An interview with William Goyen.

Stories by Sena Jeter Naslund, Charles Newman, Ray Russell, and Ira Sadoff.

Poems by Rita Dove, William Stafford, and John Updike.

The Paris Review No. 67 Fall 1976

The Paris Review No. 67 Fall 1976

$60.00

“The room where I work has a window looking into a wood, and I like to think that these earnest, lovable, and mysterious readers are in there”: John Cheever on The Art of Fiction.

Self-portraits by James Baldwin, Jorge Luis Borges, James Jones, Jerzy Kosinski, Norman Mailer, Arthur Miller, Ron Padgett, Philip Roth, Irwin Shaw, Auberon Waugh, and Tennessee Williams.

Stories by Stephen Dixon, Maxine Kumin, and Michael McGuire. Poems by Albert Goldbarth and Aram Saroyan.

The Paris Review No. 194 Fall 2010

The Paris Review No. 194 Fall 2010

$50.00

Michel Houellebecq on the art of fiction: “It’s not so different from punk rock. You scream but you modulate a little.” 

And Norman Rush on why he didn’t publish his first book until he was fifty-three.

New fiction by Sam Lipsyte, Lydia Davis, and newcomer April Ayers Lawson.

An essay by John Jeremiah Sullivan, and a dispatch from Cambridge by J. D. Daniels.

Poems by Frederick Seidel, Carol Muske-Dukes, John Tranter, and more.

Plus a curated portfolio by Lauren Cornell featuring Tauba Auerbach and Colter Jacobsen.