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The Paris Review No. 193 Summer 2010

The Paris Review No. 193 Summer 2010

$12.00

R. Crumb on the art of comics: “I am a bookmaker. I see blank books, I want to fill them—notebooks, sketchbooks, blank pages.”

David Mitchell on the art of fiction: “the universe needs to contrive circumstances to stop me writing.”

New fiction by Geek Love author Katherine Dunn, Colum McCann, Ann Beattie, and more.

Memoir by Wenguang Huang and Victor LaValle, and a dispatch from the North Atlantic by Julia Whitty.

Poems by Jorie Graham, Matthew Zapruder, and Cynthia Zarin.

Plus photographer Jeff Antebi in Haiti; a summer poetry showcase; and more.

The Paris Review No. 192 Spring 2010

The Paris Review No. 192 Spring 2010

$12.00

An interview with John McPhee:

“There are zillions of ideas out there—they stream by like neutrons.”

Ray Bradbury on the art of fiction.

A memoir of a boyhood in a Siberian criminal community.

Poetry from Charles Simic, Linda Pastan, and Deborah Landau.

New stories by Karl Taro Greenfeld, J. Robert Lennon, and new writer Belle Boggs.

Plus William Dalrymple encounters a warrior monk; photographs by G. M. B. Akash and Adrian Clarke; and more.

The Paris Review No. 191 Winter 2009

The Paris Review No. 191 Winter 2009

$12.00

Ha Jin on the Art of Fiction.

An interview with Mary Karr: “In memoir, the only through-line is character represented by voice. So you better make a reader damn curious about who’s talking.”

Poetry from James Schuyler and Robert Hass.

A dispatch from the high plains of eastern Congo by Lieve Joris.

New stories by Aimee Bender, Patricio Pron, and Carsten René Nielsen.

Plus Benjamin Percy's encounters with the animal world; a folio of photographs by Massimo Vitali; winter poetry by Marianne Boruch, Cathy Park Hong, Dorothea Tanning; and more.

The Paris Review No. 190 Fall 2009

The Paris Review No. 190 Fall 2009

$12.00

James Ellroy on his novels: “If you’re confused about something in one of my books, you’ve just got to realize, Ellroy’s a master, and if I’m not following it, it’s my problem.”

Frederick Seidel on the Art of Poetry: “I like to hear the sound of form, and I like to hear the sound of it breaking.”

New stories by Sam Shepard, Richard Powers, and Mark Slouka.

Streetscapes from fifties New York.

A dispatch from North Korea from Barbara Demick.

Plus poems from Elizabeth Arnold and Timothy Donnelly and newly translated work by Rainer Maria Rilke.

The Paris Review No. 189 Summer 2009

The Paris Review No. 189 Summer 2009

$12.00

An interview with Gay Talese: “Nonfiction writers are second-class citizens, the Ellis Island of literature. We just can't quite get in. And yes, it pisses me off.”

A novella by Damon Galgut: “The stranger who has taken up residence in her, somebody dark and reckless that he doesn't trust, is still biding her time.”

Liao Yiwu marks the twentieth anniversary of Tiananmen Square.

Tad Friend on love among WASPs.

New stories by Boualem Sansal and Kenneth Calhoun.

Photos by Larry Sultan, and poetry from Billy Collins, Craig Arnold, and Dana Levin.

The Paris Review No. 188 Spring 2009

The Paris Review No. 188 Spring 2009

$12.00

An interview with Annie Proulx: “The challenge is to make something that could be a novel but that works better as a short story, and to know the difference.”

John Banville on his novels: “They’re an embarrassment and a deep source of shame. They’re better than everybody else’s, of course, but not good enough for me.”

New poems and collages by John Ashbery.

Werner Herzog's journals from the Amazon basin.

New fiction by Jesse Ball, Philip Gourevitch, Caitlin Horrocks, and James Lasdun.

Photos by Lena Herzog, and spring poetry from David Wagoner, Ron Slate, and more.

The Paris Review No. 187 Winter 2008

The Paris Review No. 187 Winter 2008

$12.00

An interview with poet laureate Kay Ryan: “I think extravagance in your life takes energy from the possible extravagances of your mind.”

New fiction by Damon Galgut, Maile Meloy, and Padgett Powell.

Vijay Balakrishnan recalls his ancestral home in Tamil Nadu.

Poetry portfolios from David Baker and D. Nurkse.

Plus, five poems by Kay Ryan and photographs from Alaska and Norway by Corey Arnold.

The Paris Review No. 186 Fall 2008

The Paris Review No. 186 Fall 2008

$12.00

Marilynne Robinson on the art of fiction: “I write novels quickly, which is not my reputation.”

Colum McCann describes a high-wire act at the World Trade Center: “they wanted the man to save himself, step backwards into the arms of the cops instead of the sky.”

Jean Hatzfeld interviews the killers and survivors of the genocide in Rwanda after a presidential amnesty brings them back together.

New fiction from Jesse Ball and Benjamin Markovits.

Fall poetry by Mary Jo Bang, Robert Bly, and more; photographs from Iran by Mohsen Rastani and Abbas Kowsari.

Plus, in honor of our fifty-fifth anniversary, an oral history of the earliest days of The Paris Review by George Plimpton, William Styron, and more.

The Paris Review No. 185 Summer 2008

The Paris Review No. 185 Summer 2008

$12.00

An interview with Umberto Eco: “I suspect that there is no serious scholar who doesn't like to watch television. I'm just the only one who confesses.”

Six new poems by master poet Charles Wright: “I'm winding down. The daylight is winding down. / Only the night is wound up tight.”

Chinese dissident writer Liao Yiwu visits the epicenter of the Sichuan earthquake.

A dispatch from a New Mexico fire lookout: “A new smoke often looks beautiful: a wisp of white like a feather, a single snag puffing little fingers of smoke in the air.”

New fiction from Karl Taro Greenfeld, Alistair Morgan, and Glen Pourciau. New poetry from Katy Lederer and Matthew Zapruder.

Plus seventy years of complaint letters sent to the mayor of New York, photographs by Vijay Balakrishnan, and Paula Fox's memories of an unusual friendship.

The Paris Review No. 184 Spring 2008

The Paris Review No. 184 Spring 2008

$12.00

Kazuo Ishiguro on the art of fiction: “I write quite mundane prose. I think where I'm good is between drafts.”

In a recently discovered interview, Leonard Michaels talks about his typewriter: “It was given to me by my first wife. She also once threw it at my head. To help you write, she cried.”

New fiction from J. David Stevens and Tim Winton, and a debut story from Ryan McIlvain.

Spring poetry featuring Dan Chiasson, Katie Ford, and Tomaž Šalamun.

Collages by Louis Armstrong and photographs by Lena Herzog, plus a memoir from Mark Dow.

The Paris Review No. 183 Winter 2007

The Paris Review No. 183 Winter 2007

$12.00

Kenzaburo Oe on winning the Nobel Prize: “One earns a kind of currency that one can use in a much wider realm. But for the author, nothing changes.”

New fiction: Jesse Ball on early death, György Dragomán on the end of the world, and Graham Joyce on war.

New poems by Louise Glück, Steven Gizitsky, and Bob Hicok.

Liao Yiwu returns to China's lower depths: “Everyone stood up and began to applaud rhythmically while saying in unison, The communal kitchen is good, we have excellent food. Before their slogan shouting ended, several people collapsed to the floor—they were too weak to stand up for so long.”

Plus photographs by Nicolás Haro and a debut story from Alistair Morgan.

The Paris Review No. 182 Fall 2007

The Paris Review No. 182 Fall 2007

$12.00

David Grossman on the art of fiction: “I take literature seriously. You're dealing with explosives.”

August Kleinzahler on Robert Frost: “his voice is attractively American: just your average metaphysical New Hampshire dirt farmer, nothin' fancy.”

New stories from Stephen King, J. Robert Lennon, and Richard Price.

Fall poetry featuring August Kleinzahler, David Lehman, Marilyn Chin, and Edward Nobles.

Plus Pablo Escobar's life in photographs, doodles from the notebooks of James Merrill, and debut fiction from Danielle Evans.

The Paris Review No. 181 Summer 2007

The Paris Review No. 181 Summer 2007

$12.00

Norman Mailer on the art of fiction: “To my mind, it's not worth writing a novel unless you're tackling something where your chances of success are open. You can fail.”

Fiction from André Aciman: “American women are like beautiful manor houses with lavish artwork and spacious rooms. But the lights are always out.”

New translations of Baudelaire: “I am like the king of a rainy kingdom . . . Nothing makes me gladder, gentler, more prone to falconry / than my dying people.”

Plus a story by Uzodinma Iweala, a newly discovered poem by William Carlos Williams, photographs by Raymond Depardon, and more.

The Paris Review No. 180 Spring 2007

The Paris Review No. 180 Spring 2007

$12.00

Harry Mathews on “the idiotic thing that aspiring young writers are usually told: write about yourself. Don't imitate literary models. Of course, imitating literary models is the best thing one can do.”

Jorge Semprún on the art of fiction: “when I got back from Buchenwald in 1945, I did want to write. I longed for it, to be honest, but strangely enough I found it impossible.”

Ryszard KapuÅ›ciÅ„ski travels through Africa: “In the afternoon the shadows lengthen, start to overlap, then darken and finally turn to black. . . . People come alive then . . . they greet one another, converse, clearly happy that they have somehow managed to endure the quotidian cataclysm.”

Plus a new story by Benjamin Percy, debut fiction by Karl Taro Greenfeld, and the spring poetry folio.

The Paris Review No. 179 Winter 2006

The Paris Review No. 179 Winter 2006

$12.00

Javier MarÌas on the art of fiction: “Trying to be original is very dangerous. If you say, I'm going to turn literature upside down, most often the result is ludicrous.”

New stories by T. C. Boyle and Gish Jen.

More from Liao Yiwu's encounters in China: “While the corpse waited at the entrance, the guide walked into the lobby, tapped the counter, and said in a low voice, The god of happiness is here.”

Newly discovered work from Joseph Heller: “Abraham was my father. I was his son and his only heir. Without me, where would he be? Where would those promises be that he said he had gotten from his god? Then Isaac came.”

Peter Matthiessen remembers William Styron.

The Paris Review No. 178 Fall 2006

The Paris Review No. 178 Fall 2006

$12.00

Stephen King on the art of fiction: “They did type me as a horror writer, but I have been able to do all sorts of things within that framework.”

Fall poetry folio featuring Billy Collins, Mary Karr, John Drury, and more.

New fiction by Mohsin Hamid: “I was the product of an American university; I was earning a lucrative American salary; I was infatuated with an American woman. So why did part of me desire to see America harmed?”

An encounter with the woman who was JT LeRoy.

The Paris Review No. 177 Summer 2006

The Paris Review No. 177 Summer 2006

$12.00

Peter Carey on the “dangers and pleasures” of writing novels.

James Tate on the art of poetry: “The thing that was magic about it was that once you put down one word, you could cross it out. . . . I put down mountain, then I'd go, no—valley. That's better.”

An encounter with a Serbian terrorist.

Sketches and watercolors by Woody Guthrie.

The Paris Review No. 176 Spring 2006

The Paris Review No. 176 Spring 2006

$12.00

Joan Didion on the art of nonfiction: “I was never a big fan of people who don't leave home. I don't know why. It just seems part of your duty in life.”

New poems by John Ashbery.

New fiction by Alessandro Baricco and Saïd Sayrafiezadeh.

Drawings by Yoshihiro Tatsumi.

The journals of Tennessee Williams.

The Paris Review No. 175 Fall/Winter 2005

The Paris Review No. 175 Fall/Winter 2005

$12.00

The Writers at Work interview with Orhan Pamuk: “My mind is like that of a little playful child, trying to show his daddy how clever he is.”

Karl Taro Greenfeld explores the birthplace of SARS: “Southern Chinese have always eaten their way through the far reaches of the animal kingdom more adventurously than others . . . the sheer variety and volume of creatures they consumed came to include virtually any obtainable species of land, sea, or air.”

New war fiction by Benjamin Percy: “Throughout my childhood I could hear, if I cupped a hand to my ear, the lowing of bulls, the bleating of sheep, and the report of assault rifles shouting from the hilltops.”

Poetry by Mary Jo Bang, plus selections from a portfolio by Writers at Work interviewee Jack Gilbert.

The Paris Review No. 174 Summer 2005

The Paris Review No. 174 Summer 2005

$12.00

From the interview with Salman Rushdie: “My life has given me this other subject: worlds in collision. How do you make people see that everyoneís story is now a part of everyone elseís story?”

Debut fiction by Lisa Halliday: “Luigiís infinite repertoire had transformed him into a boy Orpheus. No minefield of consonants to worry about: he didnít have to speak. Even his appearance had begun to change.”

From China's Lowest Depths—Liao Yiwu speaks with a public toilet manager:“I have never seen a royal-family member taking a shit. If they did, they wouldnít come to do it in this public toilet.”

New poetry by Jesse Ball and Dan Chiasson.

The Paris Review No. 173 Spring 2005

The Paris Review No. 173 Spring 2005

$20.00

From Chicago to Chisinau—Aleksandar Hemon on the trail of an anarchist: “How did his hope so quickly turn to disappointment? How did the Land of the Free kill him, at the age of nineteen, months after he had arrived? This is what I wanted to write about.” 

“Psychic castration”—Les Murray looks back on his school years: “When American students asked me many years later what I thought about the Columbine massacre, I horrified them by saying, "We're shooting back now!"

Short fiction by A. S. Byatt and Jack Livings: “The children made chase, but the dog was too fast for them, cutting a jagged path through several of the older girls and boys who tried to intercept it at the corner. Zheng waited with Chen Wei, still gripping his butcher knife with two hands.”

 

The Paris Review No. 172 Winter 2004

The Paris Review No. 172 Winter 2004

$20.00

Barry Hannah on self-hating Southerners, .45 caliber teaching tools, and overcoming alcoholism: “I was often taught that everything is worth it for art. Everything. It was a cult.”

Disaster Remembered: “They stood in the black dust, talking, breathing, wondering at it. People came from all around in their cars and on their bikes to have a look. We didn't know that death could be so beautiful.”

Strange new fiction from Haruki Murakami: “Okawa gobbled down the sardine, stripping it from head to tail, then cleaned his face. ‘That hit the spot. Much obliged. I'd be happy to lick you somewhere, if you'd like . . .’”

The Paris Review No. 171 Fall 2004

The Paris Review No. 171 Fall 2004

$20.00

“All I need is a window not to write.” Creating from the basement: Tobias Wolff on the Art on the Fiction.

“Edison Steelhead was born on the kitchen floor. . . .”: Comics by Renée French.

Stories by Annie Proulx and John Edgar Wideman.

The Paris Review No. 170 Summer 2004

The Paris Review No. 170 Summer 2004

$20.00

An Art of Fiction interview with Haruki Murakami. “Even now, my ideal for writing fiction is to put Dostoevsky and Chandler together in one book.”

Paula Fox on art and chaos: ”I think it’s not helpful to overpsychologize. It substitutes for the chaos that most of us live in.”

Stories by Nathaniel Bellows, Melvin Jules Bukiet, and Mary-Beth Hughes. Poems by Sandra McPherson and W. S. Merwin.

The Paris Review No. 169 Spring 2004

The Paris Review No. 169 Spring 2004

$20.00

An Art of Poetry interview with Paul Muldoon: “Humility is a requisite and I fear Yeats was not strong in the humility department.”

An oral biography of Dylan Thomas: “That boy was always there, the one who shocked the girls in the Mumbles by whistling at them and saying, ‘That’s a pretty pair of knockers.’”

Stories by Melvin Jules Bukiet and Melanie Rae Thon. Poems by Peter Nickowitz, Linda Pastan, and Karen Volkman.

The Paris Review No. 168 Winter 2003

The Paris Review No. 168 Winter 2003

Sold Out

Michael Frayn on flops: “I realized that by their very nature flops don’t last for very long, and by their very nature successes do. So as time goes by it’s the successes that people tend to remember.”

Andrea Barrett explains how new stories begin: “My early drafts are staggeringly bad. I’m not being falsely modest here, it’s just the way I work, and I’ve had to accept this about myself.”

Stories by Andrea Barrett and Rick Bass. A play by William Kennedy. Poems by Isobel Dixon and William Olsen.

The Paris Review No. 167 Fall 2003

The Paris Review No. 167 Fall 2003

$40.00

50th Anniversary

Jim Crace weighs the merits—and demerits—of research: “Facts don’t help. If you’re not a persuasive talker at a party, no one’s going to believe you, even if everything you say is true . . .”

PORTFOLIO: From the files of Gerard Malanga. After working with Warhol in 1969, Malanga began carrying his Nikon wherever he went . . .

A story by Yiyun Li, the 2004 Plimpton Prize winner. Poems by Tom Disch, Joyce Carol Oates, and Brenda Shaughnessy.

The Paris Review No. 166 Summer 2003

The Paris Review No. 166 Summer 2003

$20.00

Jonathan Lethem describes his writing process: “I’m a tortoise, waking each day to plod out my page or two.”

An oral history of Gabriel García Márquez.

A novella by Michael Chabon, the 2004 Aga Khan Prize winner. Stories by Peter Orner and James Salter. Poems by Norma Jenckes and Natasha Saje.

The Paris Review No. 165 Spring 2003

The Paris Review No. 165 Spring 2003

$20.00

An interview with Jorie Graham on the Art of Poetry.

“Quite the most enchanting maniac I’ve met”: A visit with Patrick Leigh Fermor.

William T. Vollmann on the Siege of Stalingrad.

Stories by John Griesemer, Miranda July, and Josip Novakovich. Poems by A. R. Ammons, Billy Collins, Dana Goodyear, and Bruce Smith.

The Paris Review No. 164 Winter 2002-2003

The Paris Review No. 164 Winter 2002-2003

$20.00

An Art of Fiction interview with Richard Powers.

“Murder at the Beau Rivage” by Michael Cunningham, Dave Eggers, Jonathan Franzen, James Lasdun, Nani Power, Joanna Scott, Julia Slavin, and Manil Suri: Eight distinguished writers collaborate on a serial crime story. Can you guess which writer wrote which section?

America in 1959: Italo Calvino’s Diaries.

Stories by Brian Evenson, Nell Freudenberger, and Shelley Jackson. Poems by Mohja Kahf, Kenneth Koch, and Kate Light.

The Paris Review No. 163 Fall 2002

The Paris Review No. 163 Fall 2002

$20.00

Philosophy, academia, Diogenes, collage, utopia, Mike Leigh, and the world “full of rhymes”: An interview with Guy Davenport.

“Yr letters are life preservers”: The correspondence of Ernest Hemingway and Ezra Pound.

Stories by Benjamin Anastas, John Haskell, and Nani Power. Poems by John Ashbery and Dan Chiasson.

The Paris Review No. 162 Summer 2002

The Paris Review No. 162 Summer 2002

$20.00

Evil with a capital E: Ian McEwan on the writing life.

“The Admonitory Hippopotamus”: A tale from Edward Gorey’s archive.

A radio play by Rick Moody. Stories by Aleksandar Hemon, Denis Johnson, and Mary Robinson. Poems by Vijay Seshadri and Stephen Edgar.

The Paris Review No. 161 Spring 2002

The Paris Review No. 161 Spring 2002

$20.00

The Art of Translation: William Weaver argues with Italo Calvino, walks through Rome with Alberto Moravia, and goes to the opera with Frank O’Hara.

W. S. Merwin on Sir Thomas Wyatt.

Stories by Quentin Rowan, Jim Shepard, Wells Tower, and, from Russia, V. P’yetsukh. Poems by Edward Hirsch and Rachel Wetzsteon.

The Paris Review No. 160 Winter 2001

The Paris Review No. 160 Winter 2001

$20.00

The Hollywood novelist: Kurt Vonnegut interviews Budd Schulberg on the Art of Fiction and his life in the movies.

Luisa Valenzuela on Borges, politics in literature, and a migratory writing life.

Stories by Karl Iagnemma, Christoph Keller, and the 2001 Discovery Prize winner John Barlow. Poems by Bryan D. Dietrich and David Wojahn.

The Paris Review No. 159 Fall 2001

The Paris Review No. 159 Fall 2001

$20.00

Interviews with Booker Prize winner A. S. Byatt and Poet Laureate Billy Collins.

Eugene Walter on Tallulah Bankhead and the Apparition Group.

Stories by Jim Crace, Anthony Doerr, Sheila Kohler, J. David Stevens, and Wells Tower. Poems by Lise Goett, Marilyn Hacker, and Adam Kirsch.

The Paris Review No. 158 Spring-Summer 2001

The Paris Review No. 158 Spring-Summer 2001

$20.00

NEW WRITERS ISSUE

Writers at Work: Interviews on the Art of Fiction with Lorrie Moore and Rick Moody.

Madison Smartt Bell, Michael Cunningham, Dave Eggers, Richard Ford, Aleksandar Hemon, Jonathan Lethem, George Saunders, and Joanna Scott on acceptance and rejection.

Stories by Adam Johnson, Ian McGuire, and Maile Meloy. Poems by Monica Ferrell, Dave King, Jeremy Glazier, Thomas Healy, and Richard Matthews.

The Paris Review No. 157 Winter 2000

The Paris Review No. 157 Winter 2000

$20.00

The Art of Fiction: Interviews with Beryl Bainbridge and Julian Barnes.

“Dear Bunny, Dear Volodya”: The letters of Edmund Wilson and Vladimir Nabokov.

Stories by Anne Enright, David Leavitt, Julie Orringer, and the 2000 Discovery Prize winner, Karl Iagnemma. Poems by George Bradley, W. S. Merwin, and Pattiann Rogers.

The Paris Review No. 156 Fall 2000

The Paris Review No. 156 Fall 2000

$20.00

The Art of Journalism: An interview with Hunter S. Thompson and his journal notes from Vietnam.

Gustaw Herling on the Gulag memoir, the Polish underground, and the struggle to maintain literary integrity under the communist regime.

Stories by Rick Bass, Aimee Bender, and Jonathan Safran Foer. Poems by Mary Jo Bang, Carl Dennis, and Julie Sheehan.

The Paris Review No. 155 Summer 2000

The Paris Review No. 155 Summer 2000

$20.00

T. Coraghessan Boyle on God, rock ‘n’ roll, and the Art of Fiction.

A life in publishing: Robert Giroux on E. M. Forster, T. S. Eliot, Flannery O’Connor, Jack Kerouac, and others.

On translation: a symposium with Margaret Jull Costa, Seamus Heaney, Tim Parks, and others.

An essay by Denis Johnson. Stories by Rachel Cantor and Marcel Möring. Poems by Priscilla Becker, Adrienne Rich, and Charlie Smith.

The Paris Review No. 154 Spring 2000

The Paris Review No. 154 Spring 2000

$20.00

THE POETRY ISSUE

Interviews with Geoffrey Hill, Carolyn Kizer, and Derek Mahon.

Pomework: Occasional Poems by A. R. Ammons, Agha Shahid Ali, Albert Goldbarth, Seamus Heaney, Elizabeth Macklin, Kay Ryan, Grace Schulman, Anne Winters, Charles Wright, and others.

Emily Dickinson Goes to Las Vegas: Simon Worrall investigates a forgery.

The Man in the Back Row asks the critics: David Barber, Harold Bloom, Stephen Burt, Frank Kermode, Richard Lamb, William Logan, Daniel Mendelsohn, Richard Poirier, and Helen Vendler.

The Paris Review No. 153 Winter 1999

The Paris Review No. 153 Winter 1999

$30.00

Interviews with Mavis Gallant and Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright August Wilson.

Essays in three minutes or less: Russell Banks, Louis Begley, T. Coraghessan Boyle, Robert Olen Butler, William Gass, Oscar Hijuelos, Barbara Kingsolver, Elmore Leonard, Larry McMurtry, Grace Paley, Annie Proulx, Jane Smiley, Robert Stone, and others.

Stories by Bernard Cooper, Andrew Sean Greer, and Melissa Pritchard. Poems by Robert Bly, Nick Flynn, and Joyce Carol Oates.

The Paris Review No. 152 Fall 1999

The Paris Review No. 152 Fall 1999

$30.00

Arthur Miller on Willy Loman, meeting Gorbachev, and the Art of Theater.

The Art of Biography: An interview with David McCullough.

Stories by Robert Antoni, Anton Chekhov, and Günter Grass. Poems by Nicholas Christopher, J. D. McClatchy, and Baron Wormser.

The Paris Review No. 151 Summer 1999

The Paris Review No. 151 Summer 1999

$30.00

New Stories by Nobel Prize winner José Saramago, Jonathan Lethem, Kate Walbert, and Noah Hawley.

A conversation on literary biography with James Atlas, Dan Franklin, R. F. Foster, Robert Giroux, Victoria Glendinning, Selina Hastings, Lucy Hughes Hallett, James Knowlson, Jeremy Lewis, George Plimpton, and Hilary Spurling.

The Paris Review No. 150 Spring 1999

The Paris Review No. 150 Spring 1999

Sold Out

45th Anniversary Issue.

Peter Matthiessen on the Art of Fiction.

Clinical depression, competing with Norman Mailer, and a nightmare dinner with Ronald Reagan: An interview with William Styron.

Postwar Paris: chronicles of literary life by Norman Mailer, Alice Adams, Art Buchwald, George Plimpton, and James Dickey.

Stories by Daniel S. Libman, Tim Mizelle, and Said Shirazi. Poems by Eliza Griswold Allen, Melanie Rehak, and Rebecca Wolff.

The Paris Review No. 149 Winter 1998

The Paris Review No. 149 Winter 1998

$30.00

José Saramago on the Art of Fiction.

Annie Dillard follows Teilhard de Chardin’s life in China.

Anthony Haden-Guest interviews Russian artist Ilya Kabakov.

Stories by Robert Coover and Julie Orringer. Poems by George Bradley and Jacqueline Osherow.

The Paris Review No. 148 Fall 1998

The Paris Review No. 148 Fall 1998

$30.00

V. S. Naipaul on ambition, success, and the pitfalls of the writing life.

Simon Armitage writes from Jerusalem, England.

A Kurt Vonnegut libretto. Stories by Louis de Bernières, A. L. Kennedy, and Joy Williams. Poems by Anthony Hecht and Sue Kwock Kim.

The Paris Review No. 147 Summer 1998

The Paris Review No. 147 Summer 1998

$30.00

Russell Banks discusses Kerouac, Hollywood, and the Art of Fiction.

An Oulipo Sampler.

Stories by Scott Anderson, Rick Bass, and Michael Knight. Poems by Henri Cole, Czeslaw Milosz, and Patty Seyburn.

The Paris Review No. 146 Spring 1998

The Paris Review No. 146 Spring 1998

$30.00

“Your immediate contemporaries are just blind worms in a ditch, slithering pointlessly around, getting nowhere”: An interview with Martin Amis.

An essay by Alain de Botton. Stories by A. S. Byatt, Giles Foden, and Will Self. Poems by Simon Armitage, Lavinia Greenlaw, and Robin Robertson.

The Paris Review No. 145 Winter 1997

The Paris Review No. 145 Winter 1997

$30.00

“I am interested in the tension between the built environment and the natural environment, and how at the moment our dreams of bliss are a kind of invented Arcadia”: An interview with Jeanette Winterson.

The Art of Publishing: Barney Rosset recalls the founding of Grove Press.

Stories by Sheila Kohler, Steven Millhauser, and Mark Richard. Poems by Beth Gylys, Linda Pastan, and Edward Hirsch.

The Paris Review No. 144 Fall 1997

The Paris Review No. 144 Fall 1997

$30.00

Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney and United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky on the Art of Poetry.

Elias Canetti’s “Notes from Hampstead.”

Stories by Rick Moody and David Foster Wallace. Poems by Yusef Komunyakaa, Wislawa Szymborska, and John Updike.