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The Paris Review No. 211, Winter 2014

The Paris Review No. 211, Winter 2014

$20.00

Vivian Gornick on the art of memoir: “That’s the hardest thing to do—to stay with a sentence until it has said what it should say, and then to know when that has been accomplished.” Michael Haneke on the art of screenwriting: “A strict form such as mine cannot be achieved through improvisation.” James Wood and Karl Ove Knausgaard on writing My Struggle: “The difference interests me a lot—the difference between what you should do and what you really do. ”

New fiction by Karl Ove Knausgaard, Ottessa Moshfegh, Joe Dunthorne, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, and Sam Savage. An essay by Karl Ove Knausgaard and aphorisms by Sarah Manguso.

Poems by Cathy Park Hong, Phillis Levin, Frederick Seidel, Sylvie Baumgartel, Brenda Shaughnessy, Jeff Dolven, and Jana Prikryl. A portfolio of photographs by Marc Yankus.

The Paris Review No. 1 Spring 1953

The Paris Review No. 1 Spring 1953

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E. M. Forster on the Art of Fiction. William Styron’s Letter to an Editor. Stories by Peter Matthiessen, Terry Southern, and Eugene Walter. Poems by Robert Bly, Donald Hall, George Steiner.
The Paris Review No. 210, Fall 2014

The Paris Review No. 210, Fall 2014

$25.00

Aharon Appelfeld on the art of fiction: “I had a feeling that my generation—and me, also—we were naked. We did not belong to anything. ” Müller on the art of fiction: “Language is so different from life. How am I supposed to fit the one into the other? How can I bring them together?” Chris Ware on the art of comics: “Cartooning gets at, and re-creates on the page, some sixth sense ... in a way no other medium can.”

The last installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk. New fiction by David Gates, Atticus Lish, and Alejandro Zambra. An essay by David Searcy.

Poems by Karen Solie, Stephen Dunn, Maureen M. McLane, Devin Johnston, Ben Lerner, Frederick Seidel, Linda Pastan, and Brenda Shaughnessy. A portfolio of letters between George Plimpton and Terry Southern.

The Paris Review No. 209, Summer 2014

The Paris Review No. 209, Summer 2014

$20.00

Joy Williams on the art of fiction: “The story knows itself better than the writer does at some point, knows what’s being said before the writer figures out how to say it.” Henri Cole on the art of poetry: “In truth, I’m still slightly embarrassed to say, I am a poet. I’d rather say, I make poems.”

The third installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk. New fiction from Zadie Smith, J. D. Daniels, Ottessa Moshfegh, Garth Greenwell, and Shelly Oria. An essay by Andrea Barrett.

Poems by Jane Hirshfield, Les Murray, Ange Mlinko, Charles Simic, Thomas Sayers Ellis, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, Adam Kirsch, Nick Laird, and Henri Cole. A portfolio of dog drawings by Raymond Pettibon.

The Paris Review No. 208, Spring 2014

The Paris Review No. 208, Spring 2014

$20.00

Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner on the art of television: “TV writing is for people who hate being alone more than they hate writing.” Adam Phillips on the art of nonfiction: “I had never had any desire to be a writer. I wanted to be a reader.” And a visit with Evan S. Connell. “I just do it the way I think it should be done. Sometimes I have no idea what critics are talking about.” 

The second installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk. New fiction from Zadie Smith, Ben Lerner, Luke Mogelson, and Bill Cotter.

Poems by John Ashbery, Dorothea Lasky, Frederick Seidel, Carol Muske-Dukes, Geoffrey G. O’Brien, and Nick Laird. A portfolio of previously unpublished photographs by Francesca Woodman.

The Paris Review No. 207, Winter 2013

The Paris Review No. 207, Winter 2013

$15.00

Geoff Dyer on the art of nonfiction: “The process of book writing for me is entirely one of trial and error.” And Edward P. Jones on the art of fiction: “Until I can read a story physically, with the eyes, it doesn’t seem to exist for me.” 

The first installment of a novel by Rachel Cusk. New fiction from J. D. Daniels, Jenny Offill, Nell Freudenberger, Ottessa Moshfegh, and Lydia Davis, and the winner of the NPR Three-Minute Fiction Contest.

Poems by Kevin Prufer, Susan Stewart, Hilda Hilst, Charlie Smith, Monica Youn, Sylvie Baumgartel, Emily Moore, and Linda Pastan. A portfolio of nudes by Chuck Close.

The Paris Review No. 206, Fall 2013

The Paris Review No. 206, Fall 2013

$15.00

Ursula K. Le Guin on the art of fiction: “A genre is a form, in a sense, and that can lead you to ideas that you would not have just thought up if you were working in an undefined field.” And Emmanuel Carrère on the art of nonfiction: “Like everyone, I know some big words, but I try my damndest not to use them.”

New fiction from Benjamin Nugent, Ottessa Moshfegh, Andrew Martin, Christine Smallwood, and Bill Cotter, and a translation of Karl Kraus by Jonathan Franzen.

Poems by Rowan Ricardo Phillips, Jana Prikryl, Durs Grünbein, Maureen N. McLane, Craig Morgan Teicher, Luigia Sorrentino, Dan Chiasson, Charles Simic, and Frederick Seidel. A portfolio of Dutch Scenes, curated by Lydia Davis.

The Paris Review No. 205, Summer 2013

The Paris Review No. 205, Summer 2013

$15.00

Michael Holroyd on the art of biography: “I believe in private life for the living, and I think that when one is dead one should be a little bit bolder, so that the rest of us may have some record of how things actually were.” And Hermione Lee: “Some cynical biographer said to me, Make sure it’s a good death. Make sure you’re not picking someone who just declined.” Imre Kertész on the art of fiction: “Perhaps I’m being impertinent, but I feel that my work has a rare quality—I tried to depict the human face of this history, I wanted to write a book that people would actually want to read.”

New fiction from Lydia Davis, Ben Lerner, Robert Walser, Gillian Linden, David Gates, and Emma Cline, and an essay by Kristin Dombek.

Poems by Patrizia Cavalli, D. Nurkse, Henri Cole, Geoffrey Brock, Gretchen Marquette, Karl Kirchwey, Donna Stonecipher, Rachel Hadas, CHarles Harper Webb, and Henk Rossouw. A portfolio from the collection of Annette and Peter Nobel.

The Paris Review No. 204, Spring 2013

The Paris Review No. 204, Spring 2013

$15.00

Deborah Eisenberg on the art of fiction: “You write something and there’s no reality to it. You can’t inject it with any kind of reality.” And Mark Leyner: “I emerged with a torn shirt, sweaty—and victorious. That’s what my experience of writing The Sugar Frosted Nutsack was like. Battling this pterodactyl in the closet with a pan.”

New fiction from Ottessa Moshfegh, David Gates, Tess Wheelwright, Mark Leyner, Adam O’Fallon Price, and Adelaide Docx, and essays by Vivian Gornick and David Searcy.

Poems by Peter Cole, Sylvie Baumgartel, Stephen Dunn, John Freeman, Tony Hoagland, Frederick Seidel, Ange Mlinko, Melcion Mateu, and Kevin Young. A portfolio from the archives of Willa Kim.

Cover: JR, Unframed: George Plimpton, 1967, from a photograph by Henry Grossman.

The Paris Review No. 203, Winter 2012

The Paris Review No. 203, Winter 2012

$15.00

Susan Howe on the art of poetry: “I often think of the space of a page as a stage, with words, letters, syllable characters moving across.” And discussion excerpts from the First Annual Norwegian-American Literary Festival, including Donald Antrim, Elif Batuman, Graywolf publisher Fiona McCrae, and Norwegian filmmaker Joachim Trier.

New fiction from James Salter, Rachel Kushner, Sarah Frisch, Tim Parks, Peter Orner, and the winner of the NPR Three-Minute Fiction Contest, and an essay by J. D. Daniels.

Poems by Ben Lerner, Linda Pastan, Devin Johnston, Yasiin Bey, Geoffrey Hill, Regan Good, Joshua Mehigan, and Steven Cramer. A portfolio of images that inspired Rachel Kushner’s novel The Flamethrowers.

The Paris Review No. 202 Fall 2012

The Paris Review No. 202 Fall 2012

$15.00

James Fenton on the art of poetry: “What happened to poetry in the twentieth century was that it began to be written for the page.” And Roberto Calasso on the art of fiction: “The author is the successor of the saint, everyone respects the author.”

New fiction from Sam Savage, Ottessa Moshfegh, David Gordon, Peter Orner, and Jim Gavin. A portfolio of illustrations by Maira Kalman and Daniel Handler and a selection of collages by Jess.

Poems by Bernadette Mayer, James Fenton, Jason Zuzga, August Kleinzahler, George Seferis, and new translations of Guillaume Apollinaire.

The Paris Review No. 201 Summer 2012

The Paris Review No. 201 Summer 2012

$15.00

Tony Kushner on the art of theater: “As a playwright, you are a torturer of actors and of the audience as well. You inflict things on people.” And Wallace Shawn: “When I wrote my first play I read it to myself, and I immediately thought, well writing plays—this is what I want to do for the rest of my life.”

New fiction from Sam Lipsyte and Ann Beattie. Essays by Davy Rothbart, Ludmilla Petrushevskaya, Rich Cohen, and J.D. Daniels. A portfolio of animals and nudes by Walton Ford and Ryan McGinley, curated by Waris Ahluwalia.

Poems by Sophie Cabot Black, Roberto Bolaño, Raúl Zurita, John Ashbery, Octavio Paz, Lucie Brock-Broido, David Ferry, and Virgil.

The Paris Review No. 200 Spring 2012

The Paris Review No. 200 Spring 2012

$15.00

Bret Easton Ellis on the art of fiction: "American Psycho came out of a place of severe alienation and loneliness and self-loathing. I was pursuing a life—you could call it the Gentleman’s Quarterly way of living—that I knew was bullshit, and yet I couldn’t seem to help it."

Maggie Paley’s interview with Terry Southern—in the works since 1967!

New fiction by Lorrie Moore, David Means, and Matt Sumell. Essays by David Searcy and John Jeremiah Sullivan. Literary paint chips by Leanne Shapton and Ben Schott, and a portfolio of Prabuddha Dasgupta's photographs curated by Geoff Dyer.

Poems from Adrienne Rich, Rowan Ricardo Phillips, Susan Barbour, Stephen Dunn, Yusef Komunyakaa, Maureen N. McLane, Nicanor Parra, and Frederick Seidel.

The Paris Review No. 199 Winter 2011

The Paris Review No. 199 Winter 2011

$12.00

The final installment from Roberto Bolaño's The Third Reich, with new illustrations by Leanne Shapton.

Jeffrey Eugenides on the art of fiction: “Every novelist should possess a hermaphroditic imagination..” And Alan Hollinghurst: “I was rather a goody-goody as a child… It was only later on I discovered that you could be naughty and get away with it.”

New fiction from Adam Wilson, Clarice Lispector, and Paul Murray, and the English-language debut of Valérie Mréjen.

Poems by David Wagoner, Jonathan Galassi, Dorothea Lasky, Ange Mlink, Gottfried Benn, and Rowan Ricardo Phillips.

The Paris Review No. 198 Fall 2011

The Paris Review No. 198 Fall 2011

$12.00

The third installment from Roberto Bolaño's The Third Reich, with new illustrations by Leanne Shapton. 

Nicholson Baker and Dennis Cooper on the art of fiction.

Lydia Davis on translation and Madame Bovary and Geoff Dyer on Andrei Tarkovsky's Stalker. New fiction from Kerry Howley. Anonymous photographs of children from the personal collection of Terry Castle. 

Poems by Brenda Shaughnessy, Paul Muldoon, Forrest Gander, Sharon Olds, Constantine P. Cavafy, Meghan O'Rourke, and Jeff Dolven.
The Paris Review No. 197 Summer 2011

The Paris Review No. 197 Summer 2011

$8.00

The second installments from Roberto Bolaño's The Third Reich, with new illustrations by Leanne Shapton. 

William Gibson on the art of fiction: “I think I got cyberspace on the third try, and I thought, Oh, that’s a really weird word.” And Samuel R. Delany: “Finding time to work is the main problem.”

New fiction from Jonathan Lethem, David Gates, and Amie Barrodale. A collage portfolio curated by Marilyn Minter. 

Poems by Frederick Seidel, Cathy Park Hong, Kevin Prufer, Lia Purpura, D. Nurkse, and Iman Mersal.


The Paris Review No. 196 Spring 2011

The Paris Review No. 196 Spring 2011

$12.00

The first of four installments from Roberto Bolaño's The Third Reich, accompanied by illustrations by Leanne Shapton. 

Janet Malcolm on the art of nonfiction: “The 'I' character in journalism is almost pure invention.” And Ann Beattie on The New Yorker Stories in the art of fiction.

New fiction from Joshua Cohen. John Jeremiah Sullivan on cave archaeology. Photographs and prose by Édouard Levé. A collage portfolio curated by Pavel Zoubok. 

Poems by Clare Rossini, Chris Andrews, Stephen Dunn, and Linda Gregerson. Plus, five poems of Kabbalah, translated by Peter Cole.


The Paris Review No. 195 Winter 2010

The Paris Review No. 195 Winter 2010

$12.00

Jonathan Franzen on the art of fiction: “When I was younger, the main struggle was to be a 'good writer.' Now I more or less take my writing abilities for granted, although this doesn’t mean I always write well.” And Louise Erdrich on her heritage and being pigeonholed.

A novella by Péter Nádas, plus new fiction from Claire Vaye Watkins and Alexandra Kleeman.

A curated portfolio by David Salle featuring Amy Sillman and Tom McGrath.

Poems by Devin Johnston, Jim Moore, Maureen N. McLane, Albert Goldbarth, Dana Levin, Damion Searls, and more.

Plus, recollections and sketches by Saul Steinberg. 


The Paris Review No. 194 Fall 2010

The Paris Review No. 194 Fall 2010

$50.00

Michel Houellebecq on the art of fiction: “It’s not so different from punk rock. You scream but you modulate a little.” 

And Norman Rush on why he didn’t publish his first book until he was fifty-three.

New fiction by Sam Lipsyte, Lydia Davis, and newcomer April Ayers Lawson.

An essay by John Jeremiah Sullivan, and a dispatch from Cambridge by J. D. Daniels.

Poems by Frederick Seidel, Carol Muske-Dukes, John Tranter, and more.

Plus a curated portfolio by Lauren Cornell featuring Tauba Auerbach and Colter Jacobsen.

The Paris Review No. 2 Summer 1953

The Paris Review No. 2 Summer 1953

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“Every novel worthy of the name is like another planet, whether large or small, which has its own laws just as it has its own flora and fauna”: François Mauriac on the Art of Fiction.

Espinouze illustrates six Faulkner stories.

Poems by Richard Eberhart and Richard Wilbur.

The Paris Review No. 3 Autumn 1953

The Paris Review No. 3 Autumn 1953

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“For a writer to spend much of his time in the company of authors is, you know, a form of masturbation”: An interview with Graham Greene.

The prophet v. the craftsman: Donald Hall on poetic method.

Stories by Evan S. Connell, Pati Hill, Sue Kaufman, and Donald Windham. Poems by Christopher Logue and George Steiner.

The Paris Review No. 4 Winter 1953

The Paris Review No. 4 Winter 1953

$150.00

Irwin Shaw on Dick Tracy, the doom-conscious generation, and the Art of Fiction.

A fable by Eugene Walter. Stories by Alfred Chester, James Leo Herlihy, and Terry Southern. Poems by Geoffrey Hill, Vilma Howard, Howard Moss, and John Simon.

The Paris Review No. 5 Spring 1954

The Paris Review No. 5 Spring 1954

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“Damn Dixie baby-talk” and Southern peanut farms: William Styron on the Art of Fiction.

Livres d’Or: Drawing from the bars and restaurants of Paris by Picasso, Toulouse Lautrec, Matisse, and Braque.

Molloy by Samuel Beckett.

The Paris Review No. 6 Summer 1954

The Paris Review No. 6 Summer 1954

$100.00

“In fact it was one of the greatest successes in all modern Italian literature. . . There has never been anything like it”: Alberto Moravia, suffering from a horrible headache, explains his work.

A bohemian paradise in 1920s Paris: Nathan Asch recalls the Café du Dome.

Italo Calvino’s “Last Comes the Raven.”

The Paris Review No. 7 Fall-Winter 1954-1955

The Paris Review No. 7 Fall-Winter 1954-1955

$100.00

“God is a character, a real and consistent being, or He is nothing”: An interview with Joyce Cary.

“She kept nodding her head and pursing her mouth as if withholding some vital information like that the walls were wired to explode”: An essay by Pati Hill.

Drawings by Picasso. Stories by Dino Buzzati, Evan S. Connell, and Mary Lee Settle. Poems by A. Alvarez and Adrienne Rich.

The Paris Review No. 8 Spring 1955

The Paris Review No. 8 Spring 1955

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“The Negro novelist draws his blackness too tightly around him when he sits down to write—that’s what the anti-protest critics believe—but perhaps the white reader draws his whiteness around himself when he sits down to read”: Ralph Ellison on the Art of Fiction.

Eugene Walter on a portfolio of Polish artist Feliks Topolski.

A story by Vilma Howard. Poems by Geoffrey Hill and Louis Simpson.

The Paris Review No. 9 Summer 1955

The Paris Review No. 9 Summer 1955

$100.00

“Almost languidly, he pushed the sword home in just the right place, up to the pommel. In that instant Islero raised his head, and stabbed the right horn, the bad one, into the upper part of Manolete’s right thigh”: An essay on the death of a Spanish national hero.

The Art of Fiction: Georges Simenon on the eleven-day novel.

Self-portraits by Matisse, Chagall, and Leger.

The Paris Review No. 10 Fall 1955

The Paris Review No. 10 Fall 1955

$100.00

A memory like a “whore’s top drawer” and the Art of Fiction: An interview with James Thurber.

“Whenever you looked at it you heard music, divine music, music such as Steppenwolf heard when Herman Hesse gave him an injection”: Henry Miller introduces a Zev portfolio.

A story by Evan S. Connell. Poems by Adrienne Rich and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 11 Winter 1955

The Paris Review No. 11 Winter 1955

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“So two of these goofs come by in a cab and we go up North, in a hotel, out, got nine bucks, up and down, around a corner, ducking up and down, then back to Rich, the poor son of a bitch, he come out and he was bawling”: An interview with Nelson Algren.

Jack Kerouac’s On the Road.

 

Poems by John Hollander, Christopher Logue, and Louis Simpson.

The Paris Review No. 12 Spring 1956

The Paris Review No. 12 Spring 1956

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William Faulkner on ruthlessness (“If a writer has to rob his mother he will not hesitate”), his ideal job (“landlord in a brothel”), and the Art of Fiction.

A story by Gina Berriault. Poems by Thom Gunn, John Hollander, and Eugenio Montale.

The Paris Review No. 13 Summer 1956

The Paris Review No. 13 Summer 1956

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Wit v. wisecrack: Dorothy Parker on the Art of Fiction.

Jean Genet’s “A Thief’s Journal”: “My face is an oval, very pure; my nose is smashed, flattened by a punch in some forgotten fight. The look on my face is blasé, sad and warm, very serious.”

James Blake’s letters from prison.

Stories by Nadine Gordimer and Richard Yates. Poems by Richard Howard and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 14 Autumn 1956

The Paris Review No. 14 Autumn 1956

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Isak Dinesen on the Art of Fiction.

“Instead of leaving for Chile with a band of gangsters, one stays in Paris and writes a novel. That seems to me the great adventure”: An interview with Françoise Sagan.

A story by Gerard-Kornelis Van Het Reve. Poems by Elisabeth Jennings and W.D. Snodgrass.

The Paris Review No. 15 Winter 1956

The Paris Review No. 15 Winter 1956

$100.00

“My head has always seemed to me like a brightly lit room, full of the most delightful objects,” Thornton Wilder on the Art of Fiction.

Henri Michaux describes (and draws) a bad peyote trip.

Stories by Pati Hill and Terry Southern. Poems by A. Alvarez and Donald Finkel.

The Paris Review No. 16 Spring-Summer 1957

The Paris Review No. 16 Spring-Summer 1957

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Truman Capote on recognizing a good story, overcoming a snake’s nest of no’s, and barracuda ethics.

“It was like going back to the age of twelve, going fishing and all that”: Robert Penn Warren on early attempts at fiction, southern writers, and American history.

A story by Junichiro Tanizaki. Poems by Donald Justice and Philip Levine.

The Paris Review No. 17 Autumn-Winter 1957

The Paris Review No. 17 Autumn-Winter 1957

$100.00

“The moment you grab somebody by the lapels and you’ve got something to tell, that’s a real story”: Frank O’Connor on the Art of Fiction.

A pleasure principle and a Calvinist conscience: Angus Wilson defends his characters.

A story by James Blake. Poems by John Hollander and W.S. Merwin.

The Paris Review No. 18 Spring 1958

The Paris Review No. 18 Spring 1958

$100.00

“The most essential gift for a good writer is a built-in, shock-proof shit-detector”: Ernest Hemingway on the myth of his style and pumping the well.

A portfolio of Giacometti sketches. A story by Philip Roth. Poems by Robert Bly, Louis Simpson, and W. D. Snodgrass.

The Paris Review No. 19 Summer 1958

The Paris Review No. 19 Summer 1958

$100.00

“The more you leave out, the more you highlight what you leave in”: Henry Green on revision, changes in style, and the secrets of a writer’s writer’s writer.

“More drinkers should be dragged to the bottle than from it”: An essay by Niccolo Tucci.

Stories by V. S. Naipaul and Philip Roth. Poems by Philip Larkin and James Merrill.

The Paris Review No. 20 Autumn-Winter 1958-1959

The Paris Review No. 20 Autumn-Winter 1958-1959

$100.00

James Jones on dialogue (“almost too easy”), characterization (“no human being is really a symbol”), and America (“big, awkward, sprawling”).

Moon rider bound to another paradise: A Marc Chagall portfolio with text by James Lord.

Philip Roth’s Good-bye Columbus.

 

Poems by Robert Bly and James Wright.

The Paris Review No. 21 Spring-Summer 1959

The Paris Review No. 21 Spring-Summer 1959

$100.00

“Obscurity comes when the poet is still at the stage of learning how to use the language”: T.S. Eliot on the Art of Poetry.

Ignoring the Golfers: a portfolio of the eastern Long Island painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning, and Lee Krasner.

Stories by Terry Southern and Alexander Trocchi. Poems by Geoffrey Hill, Daryl Hine, and Ted Hughes.

The Paris Review No. 22 Autumn-Winter 1959-1960

The Paris Review No. 22 Autumn-Winter 1959-1960

$100.00

“I think the best regimen is to get up early, insult yourself a bit in the shaving-mirror, and then pretend you’re cutting wood”: An interview with Lawrence Durrell.

Stories by Samuel Blazer, Cecil Dawkins, and William Styron. Poems by James Dickey and David Ferry.

The Paris Review No. 23 Spring 1960

The Paris Review No. 23 Spring 1960

$80.00

“I’m all for sticking pins into Episcopal behinds, and that sort of thing”: Aldous Huxley on acid, Freud, and the Art of Fiction.

A fictional journey at sea by Malcolm Lowry.

A story by Max Steele. Poems by Louis Simpson and William Stafford.

The Paris Review No. 24 Summer-Fall 1960

The Paris Review No. 24 Summer-Fall 1960

$80.00

“Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat”: Robert Frost on the Art of Poetry.

Tangerines, blizzards, and Dr. Zhivago: An interview with Boris Pasternak.

Stories by Gina Berriault, Elizabeth Savage, and Thomas Whitbread. Poems by Christopher Middleton and X.J. Kennedy.

The Paris Review No. 25 Winter-Spring 1961

The Paris Review No. 25 Winter-Spring 1961

$80.00

“It’s a terrible struggle, because what you really feel hasn’t got the form, it’s not what you can put down in a poem”: Robert Lowell on the Art of Poetry.

Kafka-inspired engravings by Lars Bo.

Stories by Bowden Broadwater, Hughes Rudd, and Jan Gerhard Toonder. Poems by Donald Davie and Thom Gunn.

The Paris Review No. 26 Summer-Fall 1961

The Paris Review No. 26 Summer-Fall 1961

$80.00

Marianne Moore on exhilarating biology, the Brooklyn Dodgers, the art of quotation, and her “so-called poems.”

Norman Mailer on “The Psychology of the Orgy”.

Anna Akhmatova, Osip Mandelstam, Boris Pasternak, and Marina Tsvetayeva: A portfolio of Russian poetry.

The Paris Review No. 27 Winter-Spring 1962

The Paris Review No. 27 Winter-Spring 1962

$90.00

“He put me in this little room. He didn’t actually lock the door but he said, ‘Stay in there!’ And I did. I just sat down, and it just came”: Mary McCarthy on the Art of Fiction.

Stories by Harry Mathews and Mauro Senesi. Poems by Denise Levertov, Adrienne Rich, and May Swenson.

The Paris Review No. 28 Summer-Fall 1962

The Paris Review No. 28 Summer-Fall 1962

$80.00

The Buddhist monk who swallowed a canary: Henry Miller on the Art of Fiction.

Confucianism, fascism, and treason: An interview with Ezra Pound.

An essay by Alfred Chester. Stories by Ingeborg Bachmann, Samuel Beckett, and Jorge Luis Borges. Poems by Patrick Bowles, Donald Finkel, and William Meredith.

The Paris Review No. 29 Winter-Spring 1963

The Paris Review No. 29 Winter-Spring 1963

$80.00

Katherine Anne Porter on the “we” of family and dark clouds moving in her head.

“How can you stay in the ant-heap?” Lawrence Durrell and Henry Miller exchange letters.

Stories by Stephen Dixon and Malcolm Lowry. Poems by Edward Field, Jean Garrigue, and Anne Stevenson.

The Paris Review No. 30 Summer-Fall 1963

The Paris Review No. 30 Summer-Fall 1963

$80.00

A cranky S. J. Perelman gets choked up over Joyce and rants against Hollywood jackals.

An Art of Fiction interview with Evelyn Waugh.

Van Go, Van Gock, Van Guff: John Mulligan on the making of the movie Lust for Life.

 

A story by Dante Troisi. Poems by Fred Chapell and Philip Levine.

The Paris Review No. 31 Winter-Spring 1964

The Paris Review No. 31 Winter-Spring 1964

$80.00

“Experience is a dim lamp which only lights the one who bears it”: An interview with Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

“Style is character”: Norman Mailer on the Art of Fiction.

Jack Kerouac and Henry Miller on Céline.

Poems by Donald Hall and Geoffrey Hill.

The Paris Review No. 32 Summer-Fall 1964

The Paris Review No. 32 Summer-Fall 1964

$80.00

“It is not inspiration; it is expiration”: Jean Cocteau on the Art of Fiction.

“Facing the universe of sound”: William Carlos Williams on the Art of Poetry.

William Fifield interviews Pablo Picasso.

A story by Stanley Elkin. Poems by Robert Bly and Charles Olson.